The student news site of James Bowie High School

The Dispatch

The student news site of James Bowie High School

The Dispatch

The student news site of James Bowie High School

The Dispatch

In the new online PSAT and SATs, the time to complete the tests have been shortened, but both previously separate math sections are now combined and a built-in calculator is always available.
Students and staff prepare for College Board changes
Alec Morse, Dispatch Reporter • February 22, 2024

Testing is a vital part of education and is used to show that you understand the subject. Test scores are also used by colleges to choose who they accept. Because of this, streamlining the testing process...

SOARING THROUGH THE SKY: A family enjoys their day out with their children at Cosmos Coffee. Even though Cosmic Coffee serves alcohol, this coffee shop is very family friendly for a perfect day.
Perfect Jitterbug Getaway at Cosmic Coffee
Fiona Padalino, Dispatch Reporter • February 21, 2024

Are you ever looking for that perfect shot of energy to help you throughout the day, but you just can’t find the right place? Well, I am here to help you quench that yearning for the perfect coffee drink....

Distinguished Sites Banner

These bees buzzzzzzzzzz

EXTRACTION+TEAM%3A+Members+of+bee+club+need+to+suit+up+in+large+bee-proof+suits+to+help+protect+themselves+from+stings.+These+suits+need+to+cover+every+inch+of+skin+to+ensure+no+bees+can+get+inside.+Bees+die+after+stinging%2C+if+they+are+not+able+to+sting+the+keepers%2C+the+bees+are+safer.++%E2%80%9CWe%E2%80%99re+not+in+control%2C+the+bees+are%2C+and+mother+nature+is%E2%80%9D+Nona+Spillers+said.
Nick Wood
EXTRACTION TEAM: Members of bee club need to suit up in large bee-proof suits to help protect themselves from stings. These suits need to cover every inch of skin to ensure no bees can get inside. Bees die after stinging, if they are not able to sting the keepers, the bees are safer. “We’re not in control, the bees are, and mother nature is” Nona Spillers said.
Multimedia Executive Editor Mars Canepa joins Bowie’s Bee Club to learn all about it.

In the meticulous world of beekeeping, with the smell of smoke in the air, and the distinct buzz of wings fluttering, a beekeeper’s suit protects them from the dangers of handling the thousands of bees. For many, finding the right equipment is the first step to starting their journey into bee keeping.

“Texas Bee Supply really stands out among local sources,” Bee Club Supervisor Nona Spillers said. “What’s most important is that you get what you’re comfortable in.”

HONEYCOMB HOME: These wooden slats act as shells for the bees to build their hives. Inside the hives are built in a hexagon pattern for the queen bee to store her eggs. “The hexagon is natures most efficient shape. It is both strong and allows the bees to store with the max amount of room,” Spiller said. (Nick Wood)

In the intricate dance with these vital insects, the backdrop changes drastically with the change of the seasons. According to the national institute of health, the average number of bee losses in winter is 32.2%, with some state losses as high as 58%. Once bustling communities dwindle to around 10,000 bees, underscoring the delicate balance and challenges beekeepers face in managing their colonies.

“With the cold weather we’ve just had, the size of the colonies are decreasing much more than we expected,” Spillers said.

When dealing with our friendly pollinators, unpredictable weather calls for an extra layer of caution, reminding practitioners that control is a luxury. The ever-changing disposition of bees demands constant vigilance to ensure both beekeeper and bee well-being.

“When you’re in a vehicle, you’re not in control; the bees and Mother Nature are.” Spillers said.

Additionally to protecting bees when on the job, the bee club has been adamant on emphasizing the urgent need to raise awareness about the integral job bees play in sustaining our environment. According to regulations.gov, the American honeybee has declined by 89% in the last 20 years as well as completely disappearing from eight states.

A DETAILED LOOK: This close up of a honey bee clearly shows all its details and attributes. The pollinators measure to about 15 mm long and are light brown in color, with their sharp eyes specialized to find pollen to bring back to the hive. “They’re our pollinators and without them all our crops wouldn’t be able to sustain themselves,” Day said. (Nick Wood)

“Bees have become an endangered species yet they are still extremely vital to our natural habitat and the ecosystem as a whole,” bee club president Julia Day said.

Despite these deeply concerning statistics, beekeeping is without a doubt a fulfilling communal experience for many. This enthusiasm and curiosity signifies a broader truth—that people genuinely care about the well-being of these industrious pollinators.

“Onlookers are always asking us ‘Are the bees out’ and ‘Can I see the bees,” sophomore Blake Ferguson said.

 

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Dispatch
$345
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of James Bowie High School. Your contribution will help cover our annual website hosting costs. Any contributions made through this service are NOT tax deductible. If you would like to make a tax deductible donation OR to subscribe to our print edition, please contact us at [email protected].

More to Discover
Donate to The Dispatch
$345
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

Comment and tell us what you thought of the story:
All The Dispatch Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *