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The Dispatch

The student news site of James Bowie High School

The Dispatch

The student news site of James Bowie High School

The Dispatch

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Fantasy football punishments take over Bowie student body

Today Noah Ellinger/Bihan talk about this year’s most popular Fantasy Football punishments, and react to popular Reddit stories!
With+the+rise+of+social+media%2C+fantasy+football+punishments+have+become+a+popular+trend+among+young+adults%2C+becoming+increasingly+creative+and+intense.
Cooper Ceniceros-Fike
With the rise of social media, fantasy football punishments have become a popular trend among young adults, becoming increasingly creative and intense.

In recent years, fantasy football has seen remarkable growth. Just last year, in 2023, its value soared to $30.95 billion, with projections estimating it to reach a staggering $87 billion by 2031. Alongside this surge, the stakes have risen beyond mere bragging rights; now, money and penalties are on the line.

With the rise of social media, fantasy football punishments have become a popular trend among young adults, becoming increasingly creative and intense. From being tied down to enduring a barrage of thrown objects, the punishments have taken on new levels of intensity.

While it can be tough for the losers of the league, the winners relish watching their friends face the consequences. Junior Jack Considine, who participates in a fantasy league with his brother and friends, sees it as a way to bond through friendly competition.

“I do fantasy football because it brings myself and my friends closer through competition,” Considine said. “Punishments make me not want to lose the league, so it adds more to the line than just the $10 buy-in.”

This year, junior Wes Long found himself on the losing end of his fantasy league. His punishment? Completing a milk mile.

“Before the season, we had a group chat and decided the loser would have to run a milk mile,” Long said. “Everybody agreed that the winner wins the buy-in money and the loser runs.”

For those unfamiliar, the milk mile involves not only running a mile but also consuming a gallon of milk before completing the run, often resulting in cramps and multiple instances of vomiting. Long accepted his fate with determination.

“I was always down to do it, but I wasn’t going to plan it,” Long said. I told the group to give me a time and date, and I showed up and gave it my best shot.”

Remarkably, Long completed the milk mile in under 20 minutes, a feat requiring both speed and stomach strength. Junior Max Filderman believes that fantasy punishments are essential for league dynamics.

“The funniest part about a fantasy punishment is seeing your friends do something you would never voluntarily do,” Filderman said. “It makes fantasy football more fun to play because watching your friends do the punishment is what the league looks forward to at the end of the season.”

Long believes that these punishments foster competitiveness within the league, strengthening camaraderie and friendships. Enduring 14 weeks of highs and lows together, all striving to avoid defeat, adds an exhilarating dimension to the season.

“The milk mile was terrible, and I would never want to do that again,” Long said. “I will not lose again; that was a fluke season, and I’m not losing nor running again ever.”

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