On par with the disc golf team

GONE+WITH+THE+WIND%3A+Captain+Zack+Munger+preparing+to+throw+the+disc+at+the+target+he%E2%80%99s+aiming+at.+The+team+practices+on+Thursdays+after+school+at+the+Circle+C+Park.

Reagan Zuniga

GONE WITH THE WIND: Captain Zack Munger preparing to throw the disc at the target he’s aiming at. The team practices on Thursdays after school at the Circle C Park.

Ben Tillisch, Sports Editor

New sports team strives to perfect the variation of the classic golf game

Known as the gentleman’s game, golf is played all across the world, and is a sport synonymous with prestige, talent, and excitement. By the laws of evolution, different variations of golf have formed over time, and consequently, disc golf was born. Now a growing club, the Disc Golf team gives students an opportunity to engage with peers socially and nature physically.

Joining the long list of school clubs, the disc golf team was formed at the conclusion of the 2020-21 school year. The teacher-sponsor Bowman Brannon, a disc golf enthusiast, readily took on the role of organizing a club for all students aspiring to play.

“My students know that I love to play disc golf,” Brannon said. “It’s a game that is played outside with a low-cost entry, and an opportunity to enjoy time with friends and family while also social distancing, so it is the perfect hobby for our current situation.”

Played competitively or for fun, disc golf offers a way to socialize with peers, while maintaining an active and healthy body. Club president Zack Munger appreciates the low stress level of the activity and the friendships he has built with other members of the club.

“One thing I’ve learned through playing disc golf with other members is that the friendships outweigh the venue,” Munger said. “Having a good time is more important to me personally than being the best.”

The sport’s versatility in location has allowed it to thrive in the world’s battle with COVID-19. With over 30 courses across the general Austin area, disc golf has made great strides in popularity in the past year within the school population and among Austinites as a whole.

I’ve enjoyed playing disc golf because it’s pretty laid back and I’m able to just enjoy myself while playing with my teammates. ”

— Sawyer Boyd, Sophomore

“As it turns out, the pandemic is largely responsible for the exponential growth of the sport in the last year and a half,” Brannon said. “The current club has more than twenty members, most of whom just started playing in the last year or so.”

Honed through consistent weekly practice and a positive mindset to get better, the disc golf team preaches positivity, assuming a stress-free environment, while they continue to improve. By doing this, students are able to compete without too much pressure, forming a friendly atmosphere for all types of students.

“It’s important to focus on smaller things in the game that need work such as putting and [specific] drills,” Munger said. “[Brannon] also talked to me about challenging myself by competing against better players than me to get better; it’s okay to lose sometimes.”

Asa growing club, disc golf is open to all students, meeting once a week on Thursdays. Experienced in the sport, sophomore Sawyer Boyd discusses the advantages and attraction of disc golf.

“I’ve enjoyed playing [disc golf] because it’s pretty laid back and I’m able to just enjoy myself with playing with my teammates,” Boyd said. “I didn’t know there was a club for the disc golf team, but I would definitely be interested in looking into [joining] it, because I’m sure it offers a good way to exercise and socialize.”

Despite its increase in popularity, Brannon and Munger believe even more students would benefit from the tranquility of a club like disc golf, and the process and background of the actual sport. As of now, the team is composed of a small group of devoted disc golfers, but it lacks female representation.

“I would like for the club to experience the work that goes into developing and maintaining local courses, perhaps joining a workday with Austin’s Waterloo Disc Golf club,” Brannon said. “Most students in the club see it as a fun, relaxing way to socialize and get some light exercise in nature. I think it would be great to see more females involved in the club as Austin has a great support system for talented female Disc Golfers.”